Master of Science in Science, Technology, and Society

Master of Science: 45.0 quarter credits

About the Program

The Science, Technology, and Society (STS) program investigates the co-production of science and society; this is, the many ways cultural, economic, historical, and political contexts influence science, technology and medicine, and how science, technology and medicine influence these contexts. Questioning the taken-for-granted, students hone their skills in humanities and social science research methods to examine the interactions among among science, technology, identities, relationships, and how these are rooted in larger structural relationships. Through this program, graduate students explore the impact of new technologies and scientific knowledge, as well as their many social, ethical and legal implications.  The program also provides a unique international orientation, which recognizes the crucial context of globalization in the advancement of science and technology and the broad implications of scientific research and innovation in the politics and history of the contemporary world.

The STS program takes on some of our most important questions in contemporary science, technology and medicine with a multidisciplinary toolkit. Faculty from a range of disciplines contribute to a curriculum that features a broad set of perspectives, all grounded in a foundation of critical thinking, strong research methods expertise, and clear writing and presentation skills. The STS program emphasizes three interrelated areas: environment and sustainability; health and medicine; and information, identities and networks. Working with a primary adviser, graduate students develop an individualized plan of study that allows them to pursue their interests in depth. 

Prospective students for the MS in STS see this educational opportunity as an essential factor in their skill enhancement and career advancement. They are recent college graduates in the social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and engineering; middle and high school teachers; and professionals in businesses, city and state government offices, and area hospitals. Students can attend full time or part time and complete all coursework in the evening.

For additional information, visit the Master's Program in Science, Technology, and Society web page.

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the program must meet the general requirements for admission to graduate studies at Drexel. Applicants whose undergraduate grade point average is below 3.0 must provide GRE scores.

Prospective students must also submit a 500-word essay explaining why they want to enter the program. These statements are read carefully by the faculty screening committee to evaluate each applicant’s sense of purpose. Entering students typically begin during the fall quarter.

Visit the Graduate Admissions website for more information about requirements and deadlines, as well as instructions for applying online.

Degree Requirements 

The program requires 45.0 credits of coursework. At least 36.0 credits must be in the Department of History & Politics. Required courses total 27.0 credits (including a 3-credit research seminar, a 3-credit practicum, and 6 credits of research and writing for the thesis, which may be tied to the practicum). Remaining credits are chosen from a list of electives.

Basic Requirements
HIST 501Introduction to Science, Technology and Society3.0
HIST 585Technology in Historical Perspective3.0
HIST 586Explorations in Technology and Gender3.0
or PSCI 573 Gender, Race and Science
PSCI 555International Political Economy and Technology3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Science and Technology Policy
Globalization and Transition
Technology in Developing Nations
International Environmental Policy
Advanced Requirements
HIST 696Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society3.0
or PSCI 696 Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society
HIST 697Practicum: Science and Technology in Action3.0
HIST 698Master's Thesis0.5-9.0
or PSCI 698 Science Technology and Society Thesis
Suggested Electives9.0
Select three of the following:
History of Information Science and Technology
History of Medicine and Disease
Historiography of Science
Explorations in Technology and Gender
Themes in the History of Science
Themes in the History of Technology
Technology in Developing Nations
International Political Economy and Technology
Globalization and Transition
International Environmental Policy
Gender, Race and Science
Alternative Policy Perspective
Appropriate Technology for Development
Telecommunications Policy in the Information Age
Special Topics
Managing Technology Innovation
Psychology of Human-Computer Interaction Design
Remaining Electives9.0
Any remaining electives may be taken in the Department of History & Politics or other departments and colleges in the university, chosen in consultation with the STS faculty.
Total Credits45.0

History Courses

HIST 501 Introduction to Science, Technology and Society 3.0 Credits

Introduces the study of science, technology, and society. Samples different approaches to the study of STS, including methods of problem selection and research.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

HIST 550 History of Comparative Industrialization 3.0 Credits

While the specific topics vary by instructor, this reading seminar considers the development of industrial nations though time: the earliest industrial nations; the political, economic, military, and social causes and consequences of industrialization; and the processes of industrialization and technology transfer. Undergraduate seniors may be allowed to take the course with permission of the instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

HIST 560 History of Information Science and Technology 3.0 Credits

This course examines the industrialization of information since the Enlightenment. Methodologies from material culture, political economy, and social theory will be among the analytical tools students employ in deepening their understanding of the mutual shaping between historical circumstances and society’s approach to information processing, storage, and retrieval.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

HIST 583 History of Medicine and Disease 3.0 Credits

Focuses on the ways sickness and medical treatment touch larger political, social, and cultural questions in the modern period, with special attention to epidemic disease. Takes a comparative approach, devoting considerable attention to both Western and non-Western contexts.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

HIST 584 Historiography of Science 3.0 Credits

An introduction to the advanced study of the history of science. This course explores major themes, debates, and theoretical approaches in the discipline.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

HIST 585 Technology in Historical Perspective 3.0 Credits

Surveys the history of technology in the modern, industrial Western world. Uses humanities techniques to analyze various factors that have shaped the development of technology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

HIST 586 Explorations in Technology and Gender 3.0 Credits

Explores the interconnections of technological change and conceptions of gender.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

HIST 590 Themes in the History of Science 3.0 Credits

Examines a particular theme in the history of science.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

HIST 591 Themes in the History of Technology 3.0 Credits

Examines a particular theme in the history of technology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for NaN credits
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

HIST 696 Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society 3.0 Credits

Provides an in-depth research seminar in science, technology, and society, organized around a particular theme selected by the instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 6 credits

HIST 697 Practicum: Science and Technology in Action 3.0 Credits

Provides a practicum in science, technology, and society. Focuses on practice in a science or engineering discipline through study of a recent invention or scientific project.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Prerequisites: HIST 696 [Min Grade: C]

HIST 698 Master's Thesis 0.5-9.0 Credits

Independent research supervised by an STS faculty member toward completion of a required Master's Thesis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 18 credits

HIST 699 Independent Study in History 0.5-12.0 Credits

Independent study on a topic selected by the student. Independent study is supervised by a faculty member and guided by a plan of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

Political Science Courses

PSCI 541 Technology in Developing Nations 3.0 Credits

Examines the nature of access to technology in developing nations, causes of the North-South technology gap, and possibilities for change in today's global economy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

PSCI 555 International Political Economy and Technology 3.0 Credits

Enables students to comprehend the ever-changing technology-driven global political economy.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 557 Globalization and Transition 3.0 Credits

Covers the impact of globalization on the politics and economies of states and populations and the changing dynamics of interactions among them.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

PSCI 570 International Environmental Policy 3.0 Credits

Examines the prospects for effective environmental policymaking in the contemporary nation-state system. Reviews international environmental issues, agreements, and institutions. Studies theories of international relations in order to develop a conceptual framework for analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of the nation-state system.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 571 Science and Technology Policy 3.0 Credits

Examines science and technology policy as a challenge for democracy. Addresses competing social-scientific models of the relationship between politics and technology, focusing on science policy (research and development), communications, and biotechnology.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

PSCI 573 Gender, Race and Science 3.0 Credits

Examines the role of gender stratification in scientific professions, with emphasis on barriers to marginalized groups.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

PSCI 574 Alternative Policy Perspective 3.0 Credits

Provides students with a nontraditional foundation for the analysis of public policy. Covers topics such as postmodernism, feminism, and critical theory, and examines these critiques and their implications for policy analysis as a tool for achieving progressive social and policy change.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

PSCI 575 Appropriate Technology for Development 3.0 Credits

Studies technological solutions that meet the needs of developing countries. Involves project exercises in technologies appropriate to specific countries and regions.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit
Restrictions: Cannot enroll if classification is Freshman or Pre-Junior or Sophomore

PSCI 696 Seminar in Science, Technology, and Society 3.0 Credits

Provides an in-depth research seminar in science, technology, and society, organized around a particular theme selected by the instructor.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Not repeatable for credit

PSCI 698 Science Technology and Society Thesis 0.5-9.0 Credits

Independent research supervised by an STS faculty member toward completion of a required master's thesis.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated 1 times for 19 credits

PSCI 699 Independent Study in Political Science 12.0 Credits

Independent study on a topic selected by the student. Independent study is supervised by a faculty member and guided by a plan of study.

College/Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Repeat Status: Can be repeated multiple times for credit

History + Politics Faculty

Lloyd Ackert, PhD (Johns Hopkins University). Associate Teaching Professor. Russian science, history of biology, ecology.
Scott Barclay, PhD (Northwestern University) Department Head, History + Politics. Professor. Judicial systems, civil rights, public policy and administration.
Eric Dorn Brose, PhD (Ohio State University). Professor. German and European history.
Zoltan Buzas, PhD (Ohio State University). Post-Doctoral Fellow. International relations theory, international security, race and politics, diplomatic history.
George Ciccariello-Maher, PhD (University of California, Berkeley). Assistant Professor. Colonialism, social movements, political theory.
Rose Corrigan, PhD (Rutgers University) Director of Women's Studies Program. Associate Professor. Women, public law, American politics and policy.
Richardson Dilworth, PhD (Johns Hopkins University) Director, Center for Public Policy. Associate Professor. American political development, urban politics, public policy.
Daniel V. Friedheim, PhD (Yale University). Assistant Teaching Professor. International relations, comparative politics, democratization.
Erin R. Graham, PhD (Ohio State University). Assistant Professor. International institutions, international relations theory, global environmental politics.
Amelia Hoover Green, PhD (Yale University). Assistant Professor. Dynamics of conflict-related violence; intra-armed group politics and socialization; statistics in human rights.
Christian Hunold, PhD (University of Pittsburgh). Associate Professor. Environmental policy and comparative politics.
Kelly Joyce, PhD (Boston College) Director, Master's Program in Science Technology & Society. Professor. Science, medicine and technology; aging and technology; qualitative social science methods, social theory.
Scott G. Knowles, PhD (Johns Hopkins University) Associate Dean and Director, Center for Interdisciplinary Inquiry, Pennoni Honors College. Associate Professor. Urban history, history of technology, modern history.
Jonson Miller, PhD (Virginia Tech). Associate Teaching Professor. Science and technology, American history, military history.
Julie Mostov, PhD (New York University) Associate Vice Provost for International Programs. Professor. Modern political thought, democratic theory, nationalism, gender studies, South Eastern Europe and the Balkans.
Joel E. Oestreich, PhD (Brown University) Director of International Area Studies. Associate Professor. International organizations, international finance, development, and human rights.
William L. Rosenberg, PhD (Temple University). Professor. Behavioral politics, public opinion, and political communication.
Tiago Saraiva, PhD (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid). Assistant Professor. Science and fascism, environment in contemporary history, global circulation of science, industrialized organisms and food, model organisms and genetics research.
Jonathan Seitz, PhD (University of Wisconsin) Director of Undergraduate Studies for History + Politics. Associate Teaching Professor. History of religion, science, medicine, witchcraft, early modern Europe, Italy.
Amy Slaton, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Professor. History of science and technology; race, labor.
Kathryn Steen, PhD (University of Delaware). Associate Professor. History of technology, history of industry and business, and comparative history.
Donald F. Stevens, PhD (University of Chicago). Associate Professor. Modern Latin American history.
Robert Zaller, PhD (Washington University). Professor. English history and early modern European history.

Emeritus Faculty

Richard L. Rosen, PhD (Case Western Reserve University). Associate Professor Emeritus. History of science, appropriate technology, and world history.
Michael J. Sullivan, PhD (University of Virginia). Professor Emeritus. Comparative politics and developing nations.
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