Philosophy

Major: Philosophy
Degree Awarded: Bachelor of Arts (BA)
Calendar Type: Quarter
Total Credit Hours: 182.0
Co-op Options: One Co-op (Four years); No Co-op (Four years); Three Co-op (Five years)
Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code: 38.0101
Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) code: 25-1126

About the Program

A great philosopher once said, "Philosophers have just interpreted the world--but the point is to change it." At Drexel, we believe ideas do affect and change the world--in how we choose what to do, in how we approach our activities, and in what we learn from them. We think the most important reason to engage in philosophy is that we can change the world.
 
The Drexel philosophy program is organized around the idea that the study of philosophy should help students confront life's complexity. Philosophy classes at Drexel involve students in the active development of their reflective, creative, rational, logical, and linguistic abilities by engaging them with the problems of life and the world. The Drexel philosophy major is an excellent preparation for success in any field of endeavor that values thoughtful reflection, logical thinking, and clear communication about real issues and concerns. It is particularly valuable as a preparation for careers in education and law, or in graduate study in philosophy, or in fields related to philosophy like critical media studies, public policy, or science, technology, and society (STS).
 
Drexel philosophy majors take a mixture of historical and topical courses in the major fields of philosophical inquiry. These include ethics, metaphysics (philosophy of reality), epistemology (philosophy of knowledge), aesthetics (philosophy of art), social and political philosophy, philosophy of science, and logic. Our philosophy elective classes cover a wide range of subjects including technology, medicine, law, religion, science, the environment, and more. Our upper-level seminar classes are discussion-driven, reading- and writing-intensive classes usually limited to 10-12 students.
 
Prior to the end of sophomore year students may choose to focus their philosophical studies in one of three areas of concentration. These are:
 
  • Ethical Theory and Practice,
  • Philosophy and Law,
  • Philosophy, Technology, and Science.
 
Students may also remain in the general Philosophy concentration, which gives them the widest range of options from which to select their courses.
 
Prior to the end of junior year, students may opt to work on a nine-credit Senior Thesis. This is a year-long, self-designed independent research and writing project, culminating in a defense before the program's faculty and students. This project consists of three one-on-one tutorials with a faculty member of the student’s choosing.
 

The philosophy BA includes approximately 50.0 credits of free electives, which makes it possible for many students to double major. The Drexel philosophy program also offers a minor in philosophy (24.0 credits) and certificate programs in Ethical Theory and Practice; Philosophy, Arts and Humanities; and Philosophy, Science, and Technology, (18.0 credits each).

Additional Information

For more information about Drexel philosophy classes and programs, please visit the Department of English & Philosophy website or drop by to see our director anytime. The Department of English and Philosophy is located in MacAlister Hall, room 5044. The director can be contacted at:

Dr. Peter Amato
Director of Programs in Philosophy
Department of English and Philosophy

MacAlister 5030
215-895-1353

peterama@drexel.edu

 

Degree Requirements 

As an alternative to PHIL 421 [WI] , PHIL 431 [WI] , and PHIL 461 [WI] , students may select PHIL T480 Special Topics, PHIL 481 [WI]  Philosophical School or Movement, or PHIL 485 [WI] Major Philosopher class with program approval.

College of Arts and Sciences Requirements
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Two Studies in Diversity Electives 6.0-8.0
Two International Studies Electives6.0-8.0
Two Math Electives6.0-8.0
Two Natural Science Electives6.0-8.0
Four Social and Behavioral Sciences Electives12.0-16.0
Select two of the following:6.0
History of Art I: Ancient to Medieval
History of Art II: Renaissance to Romanticism
History of Art III: Modern Art
Language Requirement
Any two (2) consecutive foreign language courses (completing level 201)7.0-8.0
Major Requirements - All Concentrations
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
PHIL 211Metaphysics: Philosophy of Reality3.0
PHIL 212Ancient Philosophy3.0
PHIL 214Modern Philosophy3.0
PHIL 215Contemporary Philosophy3.0
PHIL 221Epistemology: Philosophy of Knowledge3.0
PHIL 251Ethics3.0
PHIL 421 [WI] Seminar in Ancient Philosophy3.0
PHIL 431 [WI] Seminar in Modern Philosophy3.0
PHIL 461 [WI] Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy3.0
Professional Ethics Elective
Select one of the following:3.0
Business Ethics
Ethics and the Media
Ethics and Information Technology
Engineering Ethics
Ethics and Design Professions
Biomedical Ethics
Ethics of Human Enhancement
Organizational Ethics
Ethics in Sports Management
Criminal Justice Ethics
Global Ethical Issues
Environmental Ethics
Thesis or Non-Thesis Option9.0
Thesis Option:
Senior Essay I: Research & Thesis Development
Senior Essay II: Argument Construction
Senior Essay III: Defense
Non-Thesis Option:
Seminar in a Philosophical School
Seminar in a Major Philosopher
Select one of the following:
Philosophy of the Environment
Philosophy of Technology
Philosophy of Medicine
Philosophy of Science
Philosophy in Literature
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Electives
Free Electives52.0
Concentration Option21.0
General Philosophy Concentration:
Symbolic Logic I
Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art
Philosophy of Mathematics
Seminar in a Philosophical School
Seminar in a Major Philosopher
Select one of the following courses:
Symbolic Logic II
Business Ethics
Ethics and the Media
Ethics and Information Technology
Engineering Ethics
Ethics and Design Professions
Biomedical Ethics
Ethics of Human Enhancement
Organizational Ethics
Ethics in Sports Management
Criminal Justice Ethics
Global Ethical Issues
Environmental Ethics
Select two of the following courses:
Philosophy of the Environment
Philosophy of Technology
Philosophy of Medicine
Philosophy of Science
Philosophy in Literature
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy & Law Concentration:
Symbolic Logic I
Symbolic Logic II
Social & Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Seminar in a Philosophical School
Seminar in a Major Philosopher
Select one of the following courses:
Business Ethics
Ethics and the Media
Ethics and Information Technology
Engineering Ethics
Ethics and Design Professions
Biomedical Ethics
Ethics of Human Enhancement
Organizational Ethics
Ethics in Sports Management
Criminal Justice Ethics
Global Ethical Issues
Environmental Ethics
Ethical Theory & Practice Concentration:
Introduction to Eastern Philosophy
Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art
Social & Political Philosophy
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Seminar in a Philosophical School
Seminar in a Major Philosopher
Select one of the following courses:
Business Ethics
Ethics and the Media
Ethics and Information Technology
Engineering Ethics
Ethics and Design Professions
Biomedical Ethics
Ethics of Human Enhancement
Organizational Ethics
Ethics in Sports Management
Criminal Justice Ethics
Global Ethical Issues
Environmental Ethics
Philosophy, Technology & Science Concentration:
Symbolic Logic I
Symbolic Logic II
Philosophy of Technology
Philosophy of Mathematics
Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art
Philosophy of Science
Seminar in a Philosophical School
Seminar in a Major Philosopher
Total Credits182.0-195.0

Writing-Intensive Course Requirements

In order to graduate, all students must pass three writing-intensive courses after their freshman year. Two writing-intensive courses must be in a student's major. The third can be in any discipline. Students are advised to take one writing-intensive class each year, beginning with the sophomore year, and to avoid “clustering” these courses near the end of their matriculation. Transfer students need to meet with an academic advisor to review the number of writing-intensive courses required to graduate.

A "WI" next to a course in this catalog may indicate that this course can fulfill a writing-intensive requirement. For the most up-to-date list of writing-intensive courses being offered, students should check the Writing Intensive Course List at the University Writing Program. Students scheduling their courses can also conduct a search for courses with the attribute "WI" to bring up a list of all writing-intensive courses available that term.

Sample Plan of Study

Term 1Credits
ENGL 101Composition and Rhetoric I: Inquiry and Exploratory Research3.0
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
PHIL 105Critical Reasoning3.0
UNIV H101The Drexel Experience1.0
Math elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits13.0-14.0
Term 2
CIVC 101Introduction to Civic Engagement1.0
ENGL 102Composition and Rhetoric II: Advanced Research and Evidence-Based Writing3.0
PHIL 212Ancient Philosophy3.0
Language elective*4.0
Math elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits14.0-15.0
Term 3
ENGL 103Composition and Rhetoric III: Themes and Genres3.0
PHIL 214Modern Philosophy3.0
Language elective3.0-4.0
Natural Science elective3.0-4.0
Social Science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-18.0
Term 4
ARTH 101History of Art I: Ancient to Medieval3.0
PHIL 215Contemporary Philosophy3.0
PHIL 251Ethics3.0
Diversity elective3.0-4.0
Social Science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-17.0
Term 5
ARTH 102History of Art II: Renaissance to Romanticism3.0
PHIL 111Symbolic Logic I3.0
PHIL 211Metaphysics: Philosophy of Reality3.0
Diversity elective3.0-4.0
Natural Science elective3.0-4.0
 Term Credits15.0-17.0
Term 6
COM 230Techniques of Speaking3.0
PHIL 207Symbolic Logic II (Or any Professional Ethics elective PHIL 301-340)3.0
PHIL 221Epistemology: Philosophy of Knowledge3.0
Social Science elective3.0-4.0
Free elective3.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 7
PHIL 231Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art3.0
Professional Ethics elective3.0
Social Science elective3.0-4.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits18.0-19.0
Term 8
PHIL 481 [WI] Seminar in a Philosophical School3.0
International Studies elective 3.0-4.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 9
PHIL 485 [WI] Seminar in a Major Philosopher3.0
International Studies elective3.0-4.0
Free electives 9.0
 Term Credits15.0-16.0
Term 10
PHIL 421 [WI] Seminar in Ancient Philosophy3.0
PHIL 497 [WI] Senior Essay I: Research & Thesis Development (or Philosophy elective PHIL 341-395)3.0
UNIV H201Looking Forward: Academics and Careers1.0
Philosophy elective PHIL 341-3913.0
Free electives6.0
 Term Credits16.0
Term 11
PHIL 431 [WI] Seminar in Modern Philosophy3.0
PHIL 498 [WI]
or 481 [WI]
Senior Essay II: Argument Construction
Seminar in a Philosophical School
3.0
Philosophy Elective PHIL 341-3913.0
Free electives 6.0
 Term Credits15.0
Term 12
PHIL 461 [WI] Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy3.0
PHIL 499 [WI]
or 485 [WI]
Senior Essay III: Defense
Seminar in a Major Philosopher
3.0
Free electives 10.0
 Term Credits16.0
Total Credit: 182.0-195.0
*

Students must complete two consecutive courses in a foreign language and must reach the 201 level. This may require incoming students to complete preliminary classes.

Accelerated/Dual Degrees

About the Programs

Accelerated degree programs provide the opportunity to earn both a BA degree and an MS degree in the time normally required to finish a bachelor's degree alone, or a BA and a JD in one year less than is normally required.

Three accelerated/dual degrees are available:

Admission Requirements

Information about the BA/JD program is available by vising the BA/BS + JD web page.

Students who meet the standard eligibility requirement for accelerated programs should consult with their advisor and work on an individual plan of study to submit with the Change of Curriculum form.

Minor in Philosophy

This minor is intended for undergraduates seeking to broaden and enhance their education by attaining a firm grounding in philosophy. The minor requires seven carefully-selected classes, plus one 400-level seminar. Students who have completed 30.0 credits may apply for the philosophy minor by submitting the Application for Admission to Minor Program form, available online at the Drexel Central website.
 
As an alternative to PHIL 421 [WI] , PHIL 431 [WI] , and PHIL 461 [WI] , students may select PHIL T480 Special Topics, PHIL 481 [WI] Philosophical School or Movement, or PHIL 485 [WI] Major Philosopher class with program approval.
 
Required Courses
PHIL 101Introduction to Western Philosophy3.0
Select one of the following:3.0
Critical Reasoning
Symbolic Logic I
Select three Philosophy Foundations Electives:9.0
Symbolic Logic II
Metaphysics: Philosophy of Reality
Ancient Philosophy
Modern Philosophy
Contemporary Philosophy
Epistemology: Philosophy of Knowledge
Aesthetics: Philosophy of Art
Social & Political Philosophy
Ethics
Select one Philosophy Elective:3.0
Philosophy of the Environment
Philosophy of Technology
Philosophy of Medicine
Philosophy of Science
Philosophy in Literature
Philosophy of Law
Philosophy of Religion
Select one Professional Ethics Elective:3.0
Business Ethics
Ethics and the Media
Ethics and Information Technology
Engineering Ethics
Ethics and Design Professions
Biomedical Ethics
Ethics of Human Enhancement
Organizational Ethics
Ethics in Sports Management
Criminal Justice Ethics
Global Ethical Issues
Environmental Ethics
Select one Philosophy Seminar Elective:3.0
Seminar in Ancient Philosophy
Seminar in Modern Philosophy
Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy
Total Credits24.0

Additional Information

For more information about the Drexel philosophy minor, please visit or contact the program director:

Dr. Peter Amato
Director of Programs in Philosophy
Department of English and Philosophy

MacAlister 5030

215-895-1353

peterama@drexel.edu

Co-op/Career Opportunities

Opportunities

No major prepares students for success in as wide a variety of careers as philosophy. Because philosophical work helps students develop superior reasoning, communication, and analytical skills, a philosophy major can be an ideal choice for pre-med or pre-law students. It is also particularly valuable as a preparation for graduate study in philosophy, and fields related to it, such as critical media studies, public policy, education, and science, technology, and society (STS). The Drexel philosophy major is an excellent preparation for success in any field of endeavor that values thoughtful reflection, logical thinking, and clear communication. Philosophy majors graduate into a wide range of successful careers in business, industry, law, government, education, and service organizations and agencies as well as many fields of graduate study and research.

In just its first five years, the Drexel philosophy BA program graduated students into careers including teaching, the law, public policy, and academic research.

Co-op Experiences

Philosophy students at Drexel are encouraged to seek out interesting co-op opportunities related to the skills and interests they are developing through their philosophical studies and potential career options they would like to explore. These can be as broad as the difference between an ethics-related co-op that has the student shadowing an ethicist working for a hospital’s board of institutional review, to a student who is interested in aesthetics and politics working with the Philadelphia Mural Arts Program in liaison with community groups. Students in philosophy who are pre-law frequently pursue law-related co-ops and co-ops at public and private agencies and organizations that employ lawyers and law students. Students in philosophy who are thinking about careers in academia have the full gamut of writing, editing, and publishing co-ops available to them, as well as research related co-ops they can develop by working with professors. While academically-oriented co-ops and co-ops in the Humanities generally pay less than those in the sciences, business, law, and engineering—if they pay at all—they are still enormously valuable as a way for students to develop a sense of what various careers might actually be like and how they work.

For detailed information on co-op and career opportunities, visit the Drexel Steinbright Career Development Center web page. For further information about co-op and career prospects related to philosophy, contact the Drexel philosophy program director:

Dr. Peter Amato
Director of Programs in Philosophy

Department of English and Philosophy
MacAlister 5030
215-895-1353
peterama@drexel.edu

Philosophy Faculty

Stacey Ake, PhD (Pennsylvania State University). Associate Teaching Professor. Ethics, semiotics, existentialism
Peter Amato, PhD (Fordham University) Director, Philosophy. Teaching Professor. Ethics, Marxism, Continental philosophy.
Jacques N. Catudal, PhD (Temple University). Associate Professor. Epistemology, aesthetics, philosophy of religion.
Patricia L. Grosse, MA (Villanova University). Assistant Teaching Professor. Philosophy of sex and love, Augustine and late antique religious thought, feminist philosophy.
Nathan Hanna, PhD (Syracuse University). Associate Professor. Ethics; philosophy of law; political philosophy.
Adam Knowles, PhD (The New School for Social Research). Assistant Teaching Professor. Continental philosophy, phenomenology, Ancient Greek philosophy.
Carol Mele, PhD (University of Pennsylvania). Associate Teaching Professor. Ethics, medical ethics, critical reasoning.
Flavia Padovani, PhD (University of Geneva). Associate Professor. History and philosophy of science, epistemology, logic.
Marilyn Gaye Piety, PhD (McGill University). Professor. History of philosophy, philosophy of religion, Kierkegaard.
Andrew Smith, PhD (SUNY, Stony Brook). Associate Professor. Social and political philosophy, ethics, American philosophy.
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